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Panel Discussion on Interdisciplinarity to Feature U of M, Crookston Associate Professor Mark E. Huglen, Ph.D., on Thursday, April 10, 2008, at Nolte Center in Minneapolis
March 26, 2008

What: Panel Discussion

When: Thursday, April 10, 2008 at 4 p.m.

Contact: Mark E. Huglen, associate professor, 218-281-8274 (mhuglen@umn.edu), Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)


Crookston, Minn. (March 28, 2008) – The University of Minnesota’s Institute for
Mark E. Huglen, Ph.D.
Mark E. Huglen, Ph.D.
Advanced Study (IAS) is hosting a panel discussion featuring Associate Professor Mark E. Huglen, Ph.D., from the Crookston campus joined by assistant professors David Beard, Ph.D.,  and David Gore, Ph.D., both from the Duluth campus. The discussion, taking place on Thursday, April 10, 2008, will focus on interdisciplinarity – why it is needed, how to make it work and how it has been applied in the past, particularly in the area of rhetoric. The panel, organized by the Reconfiguring Rhetorical Studies collaborative, will take place at 4 p.m., at the Nolte Center on the Minneapolis campus.

Each presenter will explore different aspects of interdisciplinarity, defined as the qualities in studies that cut across disciplines or traditional fields. This collaborative effort was inspired, in part, by the communication degree at the U of M, Crookston, which focuses on interdisciplinary communication skills and models how a truly interdisciplinary vision of research can be fused with undergraduate education.

Huglen has served as a central and formative influence on the collaboration effort. From his own research on the rhetoric and poetics of the Viet Nam experience to his groundbreaking work in founding the interdisciplinary KB Journal, which unites scholars in multiple fields with an interest in American literary theorist and philosopher Kenneth Burke, Huglen’s research had significant impetus for this study.

“Dr. Huglen exemplifies, at the scholarly level, precisely the kind of collaboration that the IAS is funding,” says Beard. “We are pleased to have named Dr. Huglen as a collaborating fellow in the Reconfiguring Rhetorical Studies research collaborative; in large part, this collaborative is a natural extension and outgrowth of work Huglen has done for years.”

A number of faculty and graduate students from Duluth and the Twin Cities will be on hand to learn more about Huglen’s current research. He is also scheduled to visit Duluth in late April, timed to coincide with visiting scholars from Texas A&M and the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, to continue this collaboration and conversation.

The IAS provides workspace in Nolte Hall and modest sums of money each year to groups of colleagues engaging in interdisciplinary projects. The funds and the space are designed to facilitate conversations within collaboratives, across collaboratives, and to the larger public that might not otherwise occur. For more information, visit http://ias.umn.edu.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston (UMC) delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. Invent yourself at the University of Minnesota, Crookston – become a leader, innovate through technology and research and secure the career you want. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.